Tips For Parents and Students To Reduce Stress During The COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is a threat to us all. It doesn’t just threaten the public health system of the country, it also affects our individual mental health. And in terms of psychological well-being, students are the most vulnerable. 

Tips For Parents and Students To Reduce Stress During The COVID-19 Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic is a threat to us all. It doesn’t just threaten the public health system of the country, it also affects our individual mental health. And in terms of psychological well-being, students are the most vulnerable. 

The pandemic still looms. But this, too, shall pass. Our young generation of students is stronger than the threats of COVID-19. So, here’s a list of tips that can help parents and students reduce stress during these difficult times. 

Give Your Thoughts to Christ

Billy Graham once said: “At its best, anxiety distracts us from our relationship with God and the truth that He is “Lord of heaven and earth” (Matthew 11:25). At its worst, anxiety is a crippling disease, taking over our minds and plunging our thoughts into darkness.”

The first step to becoming free of anxiety is to give your life to Jesus Christ. Once you’ve taken this step, the next is to practice fixing your thoughts on Christ and his promises. (John 14:2-3)

Identify And Acknowledge The Signs

Identifying the signs of stress can help students know if they need urgent mental health assistance or not. Stress can make them irritable and anxious. They may also start to have problems with their sleeping patterns, breathing, and concentration. If more serious problems appear, it’s best to seek help from a clinical psychologist. 

Kickstart A Healthier Lifestyle

While stuck at home, students should try to have a healthier lifestyle. It’s difficult to visit fast-food restaurants these days, so might as well change our eating habits completely. Eat fruits and vegetables, try to sleep regularly, practice deep breathing exercises, and exercise at least three times a week. 

Explore New Hobbies 

When not busy with online or modular classes, make a conscious shift to focus on other activities. Read a book, listen to podcasts, watch documentaries, or learn how to bake. The options are endless. 

Talk To Someone

Isolation can add anxiety and loneliness to the problem. Instead of only dealing with stress, students can be overwhelmed with more negative emotions. If that’s the case, students are encouraged to talk to their friends and family members from time to time. Parents, meanwhile, should lend an ear if their children want to open up. The emotions of these children are fragile, so parents should take extra care on what they plan to say. The end goal, above everything, is to listen.

Maintain A Regular Routine 

As we’re heading to what they call ‘the new normal’, students should try to maintain a regular routine. With the addition of our previously mentioned de-stressing tips, they should do what they always do to keep negative emotions at bay. Study, relax, eat well, and so on.